Home»US»Florida: Judge Disbarred For Soliciting Prostitution & Resisting Arrest – May Open Up Opportunity For Reversal Of Rape Victim Being Sued For More Than She Settled

Florida: Judge Disbarred For Soliciting Prostitution & Resisting Arrest – May Open Up Opportunity For Reversal Of Rape Victim Being Sued For More Than She Settled

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Since March of 2019, I have been reporting on the injustices that a Florida woman has faced at the hands of the Lee County Florida court system, her own attorneys and attorneys who have sought to sue, arrest and take everything she has and then some.  During that reporting, I recounted the judge that was presiding over her case, who oversaw the disbursement of stolen funds and a final judgment against her, was busted in a prostitution sting just weeks after the money was disbursed via the court.  Now, that judge has been disbarred.

The Florida Bar issued a report on November 26, 2019, citing that the Florida Supreme Court disciplined a total of 22 attorneys, of which Jay B. Rosman was one of them.

The Bar wrote:

The Florida Bar, the state’s guardian for the integrity of the legal profession, announces that the Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined 22 attorneys, disbarring six, revoking the licenses of nine and suspending seven. Two attorneys were also ordered to pay restitution and one was given probation. Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment.

As an official arm of the Florida Supreme Court, The Florida Bar and its Department of Lawyer Regulation are charged with administering a statewide disciplinary system to enforce Supreme Court rules of professional conduct for the more than 107,000 members of The Florida Bar. Key discipline case files that are public record are posted to attorneys’ individual online Florida Bar profiles. To view discipline documents, follow these steps. Information on the discipline system and how to file a complaint are available at www.floridabar.org/attorneydiscipline.

Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. Disbarred lawyers may not re-apply for admission for five years. They are required to go through an extensive process that includes a rigorous background check and retaking the Bar exam.

According to the Bar, “Jay B. Rosman, of Southport, Maine, received “disciplinary revocation without leave to seek readmission, effective immediately following an Oct. 31 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1979) Rosman, a member of the judiciary in Lee County at the time, was arrested on Feb. 9, 2018, for soliciting prostitution and resisting an officer without violence. After entering into a deferred prosecution agreement, he completed all requirements, which resulted in an administrative dismissal. Rosman paid a $1,000 fine; took a restorative justice course; attended an AIDS workshop and counseling; and resigned from the bench. (Case No. SC19-1301)”

Going back to the time just before Rosman was arrested and he distributed Ms. Williams’ money to an attorney who never provided one service to her, along with rendering a final judgment against her that, along with attorney fees she previously paid (plus interest on the final judgment) add up to over the amount she settled for in her underlying rape case, we discover that Rosman not only did that, but allowed for Scott Mager, an attorney who never provided a single service to Ms. Williams, to sue her.

The current judge, James Shenko, in the matter has been given nearly a hundred pages of documentation to show the injustices that have taken place in the court by the judge and attorneys in the courtroom.  He has not only ignored that documentation, but was persuaded to issued a writ of bodily attachment (arrest warrant) against Ms. Williams.

Both judges have overseen what appears to be clear violations of the Florida Bar’s rules concerning settlements and attorney fees, which state the following:

  • 33 1/3 percent of any recovery up to $1 million if you and your lawyer settle your case before the filing of an answer or demand for appointment of arbitrators or if you settle before the time for filing the answer or demanding appointment of arbitrators expires,
  • 40 percent of any recovery up to $1 million if you settle or win your case at any point after the filing of an answer or demand for appointment of arbitrators or after the time expires for filing and answer or demanding arbitration through the entry of judgment.
  • In addition to the above fee, your lawyer may charge up to 30 percent of any additional recovery between $1 million and $2 million either by settlement or trial verdict.
  • In addition to the above fees, your lawyer may charge up to 20 percent of any additional recovery above $2 million either by settlement or trial verdict.
  • At times, the person you are suing may admit that they are liable but may disagree with you on the amount of damages that they owe you. If all of the defendants admit liability when they file their answers and only want a trial on the question of damages, the lawyer may charge up to 33 1/3 percent of any recovery up to $1 million, 20 percent of any recovery between $1 and $2 million, and 15 percent of any recovery over $2 million.
  • If after the trial or settlement your case is appealed or your attorney has to seek post-judgment relief or file an action to help you collect your judgment, an additional 5 percent of the recovery may be added to the fee.
  • In addition to fees, you may be responsible for paying costs and expenses if this is what your agreement requires. These will have to be paid even if you lose your case and your lawyer does not collect a fee. At the end of your case, your lawyer must give you a written statement of the outcome of the case. If there is a recovery, the lawyer must give you a written statement of the amount recovered and how it is calculated, plus an itemized bill showing all of the costs and expenses. This statement must be signed by you and the lawyer(s) who represented you. If you have any question on any of the charges, ask your lawyer.

Judge Rosman and Judge Shenko, along with attorney Scott Mager know that Ms. Williams has already paid an enormous amount of money to one attorney and now the rulings against her by Rosman and the continued upholding of those judgments by Shenko total far more than she initially settled.  Click here to see how those numbers break down.

Upon hearing the news about Rosman, Ms. Williams commented to Sons Of Liberty Media, “A judge who believes it’s okay to buy a woman for sex is a judge who would allow a lawyer to buy the rights to sue a rape victim.  That’s what happened to me.”

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I previously wrote:

Scott Mager of Mager Paruas, LLC bought the rights to sue Ms. Williams, she told The Washington Standard, and this was confirmed by another attorney.  Have you ever heard of such a thing and can it possibly be legal or lawful?  Believe it or not, it is. Mager was not harmed in any way by Williams.  He is seeking a profit, not justice nor reimbursement for services.  He is attempting to profit monetarily from a rape victim’s suffering.

Williams believes she is being pressured to turn around and sue the “most famous female attorney in the country” so that Mr. Mager can get an even bigger cut than what a judge seemed to have awarded him behind closed doors: $1.4 million.

How was Mager allowed to do this?  Enter Judge J. B. Rosman, who granted Mager to be added as a plaintiff.

Those in Florida and other places may remember Judge Rosman as being in the news around this time last year.  Why?  It’s because he was arrested in a prostitution sting in Naples, Florida.

Seriously, you can’t make this stuff up!

News-Press.com reported in February 2018:

Rosman and five other men were arrested Friday following a Naples Police Department prostitution operation.

Rosman pleaded not guilty, waived his arraignment and asked for a jury trial.

Chief Judge Michael T. McHugh will preside over Rosman’s docket, Miles said.

Rosman was one of three high-profile arrests in that operation, including a pastor and a Broadway actor

Rosman, 64, is also accused of resisting arrest.

Naples police say Rosman allegedly made contact with an undercover officer via phone and arranged to meet at a hotel. He agreed to pay $300 for a sexual act but instead was placed under arrest. He began to resist but officers were able to gain control and handcuffed Rosman.

Here’s a copy of his letter to then-Governor Rick Scott, in which he refers to a resignation/retirement, but fails to acknowledge his arrest.

Later, I reported:

In March 2018, it was reported that he agreed to deferred prosecution in the charges against him in the prostitution ring sting.  What happened to Rosman?  He didn’t even get a slap on the wrist, more like a tickle and a wink.

Rosman agreed to the following program:
– six months supervision with early termination when all conditions are met
– pay $1,000 fine with half going to the drug court program and that other half to a DCF trust fund
– pay $50 for cost of prosecution
– attend an AIDs workshop/STD screening
– complete the ‘More to Life Restorative Justice Program’ about the negative effects of prostitution/human trafficking

This came just months after he used the court overseeing the interception of $200,000 of Ms. Williams money by her attorney and then only giving Ms. Williams 50% of it back while giving the other $100,000 to the man Judge Rosman allowed to be substituted in place of plaintiff Michael Dolce, Scott Mager.  Though the substitution of Mager Paruas cited Florida Law (Schmidt v Mueller), as best I can tell, that case cited involved a man who had an interest in a case and because he started his own company, he merely substituted the company, which was his, for his name as a plaintiff.  Mager of Mager and Paruas was never a part of the original rape case.  So, how he or Mager Paruas had any interest in this ongoing lawsuit is beyond me.  The only connection was Dolce and Dolce didn’t begin working for Mager Paruas until after this case had begun.

The point is that due to the disciplinary action of the Bar against Rosman, it may open the door to have everything reversed for Ms. Williams in the case.

However, that’s not all.

Williams has filed a Bar complaint against Scott Mager, who has now divulged the contents of her non-disclosure agreement with the Major League Baseball player who she claims raped her.  Over 100 pages of documentation against Mager were submitted by Ms. Williams alleging unethical behavior, theft and fraud.  That investigation by the Bar is currently being conducted.

Additionally, she has filed a Bar complaint against one of her own attorneys alleging that he stole $200,000 and had promised it to Scott Mager after a behind-closed-door meeting with Mager and Judge Rosman.

Finally, the attorney that followed up behind also affirmed in an affidavit that he had not agreed to an entry submitted to the court by Scott Mager, which robbed Ms. Williams of another $200,000.  All of that took place under Judge Jay B. Rosman.

Now, he’s disbarred.

If Ms. Williams could actually obtain an attorney that would put up a fight on her behalf, she could probably see to it that not only would she get a reversal of this injustice against her, but she could also turn the tables on those seeking her life.

Listen to her tell her story below.

Confessions Of A Former Gloria Allred Client

Deanna Williams Needs Your Support. You Can Donate To Help Her Survive At Her Go Fund Me Page By Clicking Here.

My previous reporting of the story of Deanna Williams and other things that were discovered in the process.

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Article posted with permission from Sons Of Liberty Media


Tim Brown

Tim Brown is an author and Editor at FreedomOutpost.com, SonsOfLibertyMedia.com, GunsInTheNews.com and TheWashingtonStandard.com. He is husband to his "more precious than rubies" wife, father of 10 "mighty arrows", jack of all trades, Christian and lover of liberty. He resides in the U.S. occupied Great State of South Carolina. . Follow Tim on Twitter. Also check him out on Gab, Minds, MeWe, Spreely, Mumbl It and Steemit

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