Home»US»Warrant For Millie Weaver’s Arrest Was Almost a Month Old – How Did She Not Know?

Warrant For Millie Weaver’s Arrest Was Almost a Month Old – How Did She Not Know?

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On Friday Millie Weaver was arrested and while many claimed it was due to the nature of her documentary, nothing could have been further from the truth.  In fact, it’s been discovered that the warrant was actually issued on July 20 of this year, a full month in advance.  I’m not sure how she didn’t know about it, but clearly it was in place long before the end of July.

Yet, she told everyone in the video that she had no idea about it.  It’s also concerning as to why the arrest took nearly a month to fulfill the requirements of the warrant.

The warrant, which can be viewed here, states that the indictment against Weaver was filed in Portage County Common Pleas Court on July 20, 2020.

Heavy has the story.

1. Weaver Is Accused of Helping Wince & Her Brother Tackle Her Mother, Felicia McCarron, in Order to Get Her Phone

Millie Weaver

Portage County SheriffMillie Weaver criminal complaint

Millicent F. Weaver is facing felony charges because of a dispute with her mother, Felicia McCarron. The indictment, handed down by a Portage County Grand Jury, shows that the altercation happened on April 25, 2020. McCarron’s first name was spelled “Felecia” in the indictment but a search of online records shows she spells her name “Felicia.”

According to the criminal complaint, which Heavy obtained from the county prosecutor, McCarron had been living at the Portage County home for about a month at the time of the confrontation. She moved in after the coronavirus pandemic forced her employer in California to shut down. The report states that on April 25, McCarron was texting with a religious leader “about her daughter being mean.” McCarron accused Weaver of calling her names. Deputies said they confirmed McCarron had sent a text message to her Bishop 26 minutes before dialing 911.

McCarron told deputies she started recording on her phone because she wanted to document how the family treated her. She claimed her son, Charles, along with Wince and Weaver, tackled her to the ground in order to steal her phone. McCarron ran out of the house and used a neighbor’s phone to call 911. McCarron added that she saw Charles run to the back of the property and she assumed he was hiding her phone.

Millie Weaver

In a separate interview with responding deputies, Weaver denied her mother’s allegations. She claimed McCarron had lost her phone two days earlier and was upset about it. Weaver described her mother as “mentally ill and not reliable.” Weaver claimed her mother had threatened the rest of the family with a knife, put it away, and then ran outside the house yelling about calling the police. Weaver told deputies they had considered calling 911 themselves but ultimately decided against it.

Millie Weaver

Portage County Clerk of CourtsMillie Weaver indictment

Weaver is accused of threatening to harm McCarron during the course of a robbery, which is a second-degree felony. The indictment from the Portage County Grand Jury states:

In attempting or committing a theft offense, or in fleeing immediately after the attempt or offense, recklessly inflict, attempt to inflict, or threaten to inflict physical harm upon Felicia McCarron.

Weaver is further accused of attempting to destroy evidence related to the dispute, a third-degree felony:

Knowing that an official proceeding or investigation is in progress, or is about to be or likely to be instituted did, alter, destroy, conceal or removed a record, document or thing with the purpose to impair its value or availability as evidence in such proceeding or investigation.

The third count is obstructing justice, which is a fifth-degree felony charge:

With purpose to hinder the discovery, apprehension, prosecution, conviction, or punishment of Millicent F. Weaver, Charles L. Weaver Jr and/or Gavon S. Wince for a crime or to assist another to benefit from the commission of a crime, communicate false information to (any person), and the crime committed by the person aided is a felony of the fifth, fourth or third degree.

The fourth charge is a first-degree misdemeanor count of domestic violence. The Grand Jury found probable cause that Weaver had “recklessly caused serious physical harm to the family or household member.”

Davey Crocko breaks down what was going on.

If you have no seen the documentary that she produced, Shadow Gate, the reality is that not much of anything is new news.  And frankly, I question some of those interviewed in the documentary.  I’m not saying they are not genuine, I’m just saying I question a lot of their involvement.

Weaver was released on a personal recognizance bond on Monday.  Both Gavin Wince and Charles Weaver remain in jail.

Millie Weaver

One thing is for sure, the GoFundMe Page set up by Ezra Levant has garnered nearly $140,000.  Seems like someone is making out like a fat cat in all of this.

Navy veteran Walter Fitzpatrick, after seeing the indictment, stands by his previous assertion that the indictment itself is void.

Was Millie Weaver’s Grand Jury Indictment Lawful?

Fitzpatrick claims that the indictment is void due to the following citations from the Supreme Court.

SECTION 2939.02 (LAST SENTENCE): “The judge of the court of common pleas may select any person who satisfies the qualifications of a juror and whose name is not included in the annual jury list to preside as foreperson of the grand jury, in which event the grand jury shall consist of the foreperson so selected and fourteen additional grand jurors selected from the annual jury list.”
The above citation comes from THIS.
The Ohio practice is identical to the outlawed method of selection used in Tennessee. I’ve been fighting this conflict for a decade. Trust me. Been there, done that, got the tee shirt, sold it in a garage sale.
The U.S. Supreme Court rulings on this are found in Rose v. Mitchell (1979) and Hobby v. U.S. (1984).
Clearly, this indictment and the arrest were not about her documentary, but it’s clear that the arrest was used to promote the documentary.
Article posted with permission from Sons of Liberty Media

Tim Brown

Tim Brown is an author and Editor at FreedomOutpost.com, SonsOfLibertyMedia.com, GunsInTheNews.com and TheWashingtonStandard.com. He is husband to his "more precious than rubies" wife, father of 10 "mighty arrows", jack of all trades, Christian and lover of liberty. He resides in the U.S. occupied Great State of South Carolina. . Follow Tim on Twitter. Also check him out on Gab, Minds, MeWe, Spreely, Mumbl It and Steemit

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